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Extraterrestrial Sex Fetish

in the support of the author’s message. Section 17 of his analysis of the philosophers’ ruminations (Henri Bergson) provides the first substantial indication of the basis of the author’s outlandish flights of imagination in the first, fantasy set: it is a calculated application of imagination – outrageous, sexualised science fiction derived from philosophy.

If not enthralled by philosophy, most readers who have been tempted to pick up such a book will probably not be disappointed with the standalone micro-stories of Mercury de Sade’s sexual exploits with aliens, although they might take note of some thematic repetition regarding the intergenerational sexual customs of a minority of alien cultures, and the author’s own apparent fetish for the Crab Nebula… But all is not what it seems; for example, with section 13 of the fantasy set, “Felo de Sex”, what begins as a vaguely ludicrous concept replete with black humour ends in a poetical sadness. And then the coldness portrayed in an early fantasy as Mercury de Sade observes the unintended fatal results of his pleasure, expressed in the words “Too bad for them I’m a man”, serves as a herald of the latent cruelty expressed much later as a real man in New York in section 16.

This is the first of Supervert’s books; his subsequent efforts display a development of his literary ability, but ET Sex Fetish does have moments of inspiration. And there is a real purpose: by examining humanity’s obsession with that which exists outside our own small world of flesh, bone and thought, Supervert furnishes us with a literally unique, if outrageous – and yes, “perverted” – reflection on our petty internal worlds.

The aim of this review is not to debate the validity of the author’s conclusions regarding the (non) existence of extraterrestrial life; after all, he does state in his second appendix that his intention was to confront “the myth of extraterrestrial life” – and surely, at this point in humanity’s history and evolution, we are indeed dealing with myth, romance and longing. So, whether or not the scientific odds are, at least theoretically, beginning to point towards a greater possibility of extraterrestrial life, one point that Supervert makes utilising the contemplations of Immanuel Kant is indisputable: until we actually experience the reality of extraterrestrial life, whatever other life may in fact exist, does not, in effect, exist for us in any practical sense.

More importantly, we cannot detract from what we might suspect is Supervert’s more pertinent, underlying message: that everything we desire, everything we need, as well as everything nonconsensually abhorrent, are right here on Earth; that humanity has more than enough to occupy itself in its own identity and emotional and psychological turmoil, which too often manifests in an ugly and destructive psychopathology. In other words, “the final frontier” – to coin the famous and clichéd words of an iconic television science fiction series – is not so much outer space, but our species’ own internal space. SDk

Extraterrestrial Sex Fetish is published by Supervert 32C Inc. (New York, 2011): 213pp.

 

Additional Info

Extraterrestrial Sex Fetish

If not enthralled by philosophy, most readers who have been tempted to pick up such a book will probably not be disappointed with the standalone micro-stories
of Mercury de Sade’s sexual exploits with aliens.